Sunday, August 25th, 2019

WNBA partners with 100 Black Men of America, Inc. to honor father-daughter bonds

Published on June 15, 2012

By

From the WNBA:

The WNBA and 100 Black Men of America, Inc. will come together to celebrate the special connection between dads and daughters or girls with their male father figures by inviting them to experience female athleticism at its best. The WNBA Dads and Daughters program with 100 Black Men of America nurtures healthy relationships between fathers, daughters, mentors, and mentees by providing opportunities for them to spend quality time together through the game of basketball.

“We are pleased to work with 100 Black Men of America on the WNBA’s Dads and Daughters initiative, and we can’t think of a better way to foster these special relationships than by building strong bonds at WNBA games," said WNBA President Laurel J. Richie. “In addition to experiencing great entertainment, this initiative provides opportunity for these families and friends to build lifelong memories.”

“We are proud to announce our program with the WNBA. The 100 Black Men of America is committed to the ongoing development, education and well-being of tomorrow’s leaders and this initiative will allow us to expand our efforts in providing opportunities to improve overall health and well-being of young people,” said Chairman Albert E. Dotson, Jr., Esq. “We respect the WNBA’s commitment to service and know that together, our efforts to uplift the community will continue to grow and look forward to helping our local chapters support WNBA teams in their respective markets.”

To tip off the WNBA’s Dads and Daughters celebration with 100 Black Men of America, several activities are scheduled for June 15, including a special recognition at the Chairman’s Award Luncheon at the Hyatt Regency in Atlanta where WNBA President Laurel J. Richie will receive the Chairman’s Award for Mentoring Leadership. Members of 100 Black Men of America and the WNBA will reunite later that evening with students from the mentee program at Philips Arena for a night filled with excitement and festivities, including a halftime presentation on center court during the Atlanta Dream’s game against the Los Angeles Sparks. In addition, the young fans will have the opportunity to meet with select WNBA players and receive special items from the Atlanta Dream.

The WNBA Dads and Daughters program with 100 Black Men of America program will also include the opportunity for two members of the Collegiate 100 or 100 Black Men of America’s mentee group to be considered for a summer internship at the WNBA’s headquarters in New York.

The history of the 100 from 100blackmen.org:

The overall concept of the 100 began in New York in 1963 when a group of concerned African American men began to meet to explore ways of improving conditions in their community. The group eventually adopted the name, "100 Black Men, Inc." as a sign of solidarity. These men envisioned an organization that would implement programs designed to improve the quality of life for African Americans and other minorities. They also wished to ensure the future of their communities by aiming an intense number of resources toward youth development. These members were successful black men from various walks of life. These visionaries were business and industry leaders such as David Dinkins, Robert Mangum, Dr. William Hayling, Nathaniel Goldston III, Livingston Wingate, Andrew Hatcher, and Jackie Robinson.

Today the organization has grown to over 116 chapters with more than 10,000 members who continue to strive to improve the quality of life in our communities and enhance the educational and economic opportunities for African Americans. 100 Black Men of America, Inc. has more than 100,000 youth participants annually in its mentoring and youth development programs. With a mission to improve the quality of life and enhance educational opportunities for African Americans, members of the 100 continue to serve as a strong force in the world by overcoming the cultural and financial obstacles that have limited the achievements of some African Americans, particularly young African American males. Members of the 100 have made outstanding progress, proving that Blacks can, and do, excel as corporate leaders, community leaders and as independent business owners.


 

Tags:

Readers Comments (0)

Comments are closed.

Connect



Sign up for Hoopfeed's Weekly Newsletter

* = required field

 

Twitter


 

Search

%d bloggers like this: